SPECIAL THANKS. I would like to thank Paul Watson for his sponsorship of several lead figure collections on this blog. Having decided to clear his spare/surplus figures, he generously forwarded them on with no other requirement than they deserved to be restored. I would also like to mention George S. Mills, who kindly furnished a quantity of metal and plastic figures which allowed me to complete another five or six military units, serving in several collections.

Tuesday, 22 November 2022

A Minor Skirmish in Alaska (Fictional Wargame)

The settlement at Port Alexander had declined to accept Empire terms for neutrality. A Royal Navy gunboat was duly sent to remedy this. The local population in about 1900 was 2000+ (its now less than 85!). For the game, I allowed the settlement sixteen defenders, split into three sections.

While the outcome was not in doubt, it was still fun to play. MOVE ONE gunboat misses the Station house, MOVE TWO a hit but no casualties. MOVE THREE a miss, MOVE FOUR a hit but no casualties, MOVE FIVE Hit on the buildings side. MOVE SIX hit with a casualty, the armed locals rout. MOVE SEVEN another hit on the now empty building, and it catches alight! MOVE EIGHT a miss on the barn. MOVE NINE a hit on the barn, but no casualties. MOVE TEN a miss. MOVE ELEVEN a miss. MOVE 12 a miss. MOVE THIRTEEN a hit on the barn, no casualties. RN Rowboat sets off with eight armed seamen. MOVE FOURTEEN Landing party arrives, gunboat now opens up on an unoccupied house. MOVE FIFTEEN landing party comes under fire from locals. MOVE SIXTEEN some casualties, on both sides. The locals surrender (D1).

LOSSES, two on each side. The station house is on fire. The local population now agrees to remain neutral for the remainder of the war. This leaves only Skegway, in the lower part of Alaska, which has not accepted terms, due to local disagreements. 

 
LOWER ALASKA
MGB

6 comments:

  1. Looks like a very enjoyable little skirmish Michael! The Deetail cowboys make an excellent group of Alaskan locals and your boats look marvelous! Well done!

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    1. Cheers Brad, I did wonder if it was worth staging, its such a small scenario, but I'm glad I did. No doubts on the outcome, but I did oblige the Empire to plan ahead its movements, so there was a risk of heavier casualties. Yes, the Deetail cowboys are proving useful!
      Michael

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  2. You've beautifully demonstrated that not every game needs a table full of figures to look impressive and tell a great story. The locals did their best and I hope they hold their heads up about that (and possibly foment guerrilla-style rebellion?). I'll second Brad's comment about the Deetail cowboys and your boats!

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    1. Hi John, I had to find a solution as it was the only settlement that had declined to accept neutrality, so I played a game. The Empire resources are nowhere near sufficient to garrison Alaska, and an American army is actually advancing on Vancouver, British Columbia. The Alaskan expedition is just to embarrass the US president and encourage negotiations. The gunboat has the power to damage coastal building, but thats about it. Thats why its only demanding neutrality. To be honest, these skirmish games are fun, but they become all the more interesting when linked to a campaign, where resources are limited. Interestingly, it has surprised me how often a regional stalemate occurs, neither side wishing to risk an engagement. Thanks for the interest.
      Michael

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  3. A good little skirmish.

    Brings memories to mind of my being entertained and shown the town by an officer of the US Naval Reserve and an epic night on the town in Anchorage in the '70's that almost led to me being awol when my ship sailed in the morning. But that's another story.

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    1. Hi Ross, my father's exploits in the Fleet Air Arm were similar. I don't see the RN moving on Anchorage as there is a serious threat to the city of Vancouver. But it has given weight to the Empire in any peace negotiations, the same thing has happened in Maine. The US has now fortified London in Ontario, but their position in Ottawa is 'strange'. Problem is, the Empire can't risk sending and losing the armies protecting Montreal and Toronto. There are also rumours that the US plan to break the Chesapeake blockade, now the French fleet has gone home. By the way, your message appeared as hidden, hence the delay in my reply?
      Michael

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