SPECIAL THANKS. I would like to thank Paul Watson for his sponsorship of several lead figure collections on this blog. Having decided to clear his spare/surplus figures, he generously forwarded them on with no other requirement than they deserved to be restored.

Thursday, 14 January 2021

MORE PAINTED AMERICANS

With skirmishers proving useful in my Dominion War campaign, the Americans have now gained two light infantry units. The pale blue are the Germania Rifles, a California National Guard unit which had a reputation for good marksmanship. The second, in dark blue, are the Honolulu Rifles, now in exile since the Hawaiian islands are now under British protection.




  

Among the broken toy soldiers recently picked up were two Timpo bandsmen. Dating to the 1950s, both were damaged, one having lost a third of its torso. As neither were likely to be drafted, decided to convert these figures into supernumeraries. The band master is now a sergeant in the 1st Battery, New York National Guard. The cymbal playing bandsman has become an officer in the Louisville Legion.

MGB



8 comments:

  1. Like the look of these National Guard uniforms - very colourful .

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    1. Tony, they really are over the top in their parade uniforms, I suspect many would have worn ACW uniforms in a real war, they had a load still in stock as late as the 1880s, can't vouch for the condition.
      Michael

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  2. Nice recovery of old toy soldiers. But to me, that light blue with white busby just screams American college marching band.(:

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    1. Ross, its funny you say that. I always thought their college marching bands looked somewhat daft, that they undermined the distinction and elegance of a well turned-out military unit (for example The South Carolina Corps of Cadets)...... I now see that their marching bands are actually continuing a tradition of over-the-top dress uniforms deriving from the 19th century. I read a newspaper report about a visit of some American NG to Canada in the 1890s, for joint manoeuvres. The Canadians got on well with their visitors but thought their uniforms and accoutrements looked like something out of the Napoleonic wars!!!!!! So we aren't alone in thinking they are somewhat bold, to put it mildly.
      Michael

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    2. Well, when push comes to shove, its not the uniform but the person inside that matters.

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    3. Ross, Not all uniforms initially adopted by the British volunteer movement met with public approval, this unit later went into grey tunics with rifleman distinctions, and here is why......"Until the matter was ultimately settled, the diversity of uniforms, occasioned by the zeal of commanders, produced some startling effects ... [In 1899] The dress selected was a Zouave costume modelled after the style of Louis Napoleon's famous (or infamous) Algerians. The ... unit marched through the streets of London and had to endure a fire of ridicule more devastating than any enemy fusillade could have been."

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  3. Great work converting the damaged bandsmen!

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    1. MJT, I used tissue paper and glue to quickly fill the torso, then used milliput to reproduce a laced coat. The following day I drilled holes and pinned home-cast head, arms, and scabbard.
      Michael

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